Friday, September 20, 2019
1. What type of files can I send?
We recommend saving as a .PDF You may also send the file in the following types: jpg, jpeg, psd, tif, tiff, eps, ai, and png. We prefer that you send .PDF and .EPS files with outlined fonts. These files are easier to handle and will likely speed up your turn-around. Remember to add crop marks and flatten your files before upload ing.

 


2. What color mode should my files be?
If you send us an RGB file, there is a chance that a color shift may occur and you may not be satisfied with your job.

 

THESE COLORS ARE IN RGB
rgb colors

 

THESE ARE THE SAME COLORS BUT IN CMYK
cmyk ex.
You should always start and finish your designs in CMYK color mode.

 

3. What resolution should my file be?
Low resolution files may be printed as is or will be placed on hold until we receive new files, slowing your turn­around.
low res ex.
THESE ARE 72 DPI LOW RES IMAGES

300 dpi ex.
THESE ARE THE SAME IMAGES BUT AT 300 DPI

 

4. How should I set up my bleed and crop marks?
Bleed must extend further than the cut line. Please keep all text and anything you do not want cut at least .125" away from the cut line. When sending an .eps or .pdf, make sure you include crop marks so we can cut the job correctly.

 

5. Do you accept borders on jobs?
borders
We cut through many sheets at a time, so watch your borders to avoid an unwanted mistake.

 

6. How can I avoid transparency issues?
Any transparency issue can be resolved before saving your file.
What a transparency problem looks like on screen...               After a transparency problem is printed.
transparencies
To prevent this, never use shadows, glows, or any other transparency (image or otherwise) on top of a spot color. Always convert your spot color to CMYK and flatten before sending.

 

SHADOWS GLOWS TRANSPARENCY
problems
All of these effects will cause transparency problems.

 

 

 

7. What is overprint, and how can it ruin my file?
Primarily used to intentionally overlap inks for a number of reasons, overprint can cause unexpected results. We suggest that you turn all overprint objects off before submitting your files.
overprint
Blue printed without oveprint    Blue printed with overprint

 

 

ON SCREEN VIEW AFTER PRINTING In this case the logo was set to overprint. The colors from logo are mixing with the colors from the background. Unexpected results may occur if you have accidentally set certain objects to overprint. Always check logos and other artwork before submitting.

 

8. How can I make sure my blues do not come out purple?
When using a blue in your design, always make sure to leave at least a 30% difference in your Cyan and Magenta values.
100% C 100% M 0% Y 0% K
ref screenref print
   ON SCREEN     AFTER PRINTING
Blue is close to purple in the CMYK spectrum. Remember, use a low amount of magenta whenever using high amounts of cyan to avoid purple. EXAMPLE: C-100 M-70 Y-0 K-0

 

9. How do I export a .pdf correctly?
When exporting from any program such as Indesign or Illustrator, use these settings to make sure your .PDF files export correctly.
EXPORT SETTINGS FOR .PDF FILES: Adobe PDF Preset is set to: Press Quality Compatibility is set to: Acrobat 4 (PDF 1.3) Compress Text and Line Art is set to: Off

 

 

 

10. What is rich black and how can I get it?
Rich black is an ink mixture of solid black, 100% K, with additional CMY ink values. This results in a darker tone than black ink alone. If you print black alone as 100% K, the resulting black may not be as dark as you might like.
100% K ON SCREEN 100% K AFTER PRINT
richblk reg blk
We recommend using C 60 M 40 Y 40 K 100 This will give you a deep, dark, rich black.

 

 

 

11. Why does my business card crack around the edges?
Cracking of the edges of a business card sometimes occurs when the card contains high values of ink, as in dark colors. CLOSE UP OF BUSINESS CARD This usually happens on a small amount of cards in the run. To prevent this, use lighter colors or if you must use dark colors, use as little ink as possible.
crack bc

 

12. What is banding? Many things can cause banding. Banding can be caused by the program that it is exported from, such as Indesign or Corel. Also, too many gradient steps, for example going from a very light color to a dark color, in a small area will cause banding.
CLOSE UP OF BANDING
banding
To prevent this, check your digital files before sending. If you use a gradient, make sure it has enough room for a smooth transition.

 

13. Why is there cracking on my scoring job?
When a job is coated with UV then scored and folded the job may begin to crack.
crack

 

 

 

14. How can Pantone colors affect the way my job prints?
There are three different ways Pantone colors can affect the way your job prints. The first is by object effects, such as shadows or glows, on top of your Pantone colors. Here is what the effects will look like on screen:
shadowglow

 

Here is what the effect looks like after printing:
shadow pms pms glow
As you can see, when a Pantone color is under these object effects, transparency issues show up during printing. To avoid this, convert all your Pantone colors into CMYK before submitting your order. The second way Pantone colors can affect your file is when you use transparent images.

 

You can see the image is no longer transparent on top of the Pantone color. These white areas will show up dur­ing printing. To fix this issue, convert all your Pantone colors into CMYK. If you need to have a Pantone color in your art, for example when doing a silver 877c job, you must create a clipping mask around the image so the white area will not show up. This must be done before submitting the order. The last way Pantone colors can affect your order is the color conversion between a Pantone color and CMYK. All of our normal printing is done in CMYK unless you specifically order a Silver, MU, or Custom job. If you use Pantone colors in a job that will print CMYK, your job might print with undesirable colors.
pms ex.
If you send in a job with Pantone colors, the CMYK conversion will change the Pantone color. Before sending your order, make sure all Pantone colors have been converted to CMYK.

 

15. How do I count pages for multi-page booklets?
The outside front cover is "Page 1", the inside cover is "Page 2" and so on.

 

16. What about privacy and security?
No information we collect for order processing or from inquiries is shared with any other company or website. Your information is only used to contact you when necessary. Credit Card information is only used to bill you for products and services ordered. Our secure shopping cart uses the latest secure server technology. Your order is submitted and retrieved with a secure connection to our server and remains secure at all times. Most experts consider that ordering securely on the internet is as safe or safer than giving your information over the phone or to stores. Most cards have a Zero Liability policy for internet use and limit your liability in the case of fraudulent use of your card.

 

17. Is there an extra charge for bleeds?
No. Unlike many other companies, all our prices include full bleeds free of charge. See our Design Hints page for an explanation of bleeds.

 

18. How do I order multiple pieces?
To keep things simple, please place a separate order for each different printed piece you want produced. For ex­ample, if you want 3 different 11x17 brochures, please place 3 orders. Obviously, the price for 3,000 of one bro­chure is not the same as the price for 1,000 each of 3 different brochures.

 

19. What kind of paper will my job be printed on?
We have several paper types available, depending on what you are ordering. The individual pricing pages show available options.

 

20. How well will my job match what I see on my monitor?
Most people are surprised at how well their job matches what they see. But because of wide differences in moni­tor calibration and the different technologies used, some printed colors may not exactly match the colors on your specific monitor. Please see our RGB - CMYK Information page for important instructions on getting the results you want. Our Design Hints page has additional information and illustrations.

 

21. Will you match a sample I print out on my own printer, or a previously printed sample?
At Graphic Services, part of the way we offer fast turnaround and low pricing is by printing to a "pleasing color" standard, using standard ink densities. Therefore, there is no guarantee that your finished piece will approximate your printed sample. This is due in part to the widely varying results from different output devices including inkjet and laser printers, continuous tone proofing devices, high-resolution film-based proofs, and different than true offset lithography. Even from one commercial printing firm to another, there can be significant differences in results. In particular, inkjet and laser prints are known to look substantially different than true offset lithogra­phy. If you require precise color match, please contact us to arrange for a digital color proof. Once you approve the additional fees (starting at $40), we will produce and send you a hard proof via overnight delivery. When you approve and return the proof, we will strive to match the color of the proof when printing your final piece. There are substantial additional charges for precise color match service. Also, if you request color correction or other changes after you see your proof, there will be a minimum of another $40+ charged for color correction time and a new proof. Bottom line: the final product we produce for you is unlikely to match the output from your inkjet -- it will look more professional!

 

22. How do I place an order and have my graphic designer upload my files separately?
When you place your order, select the "I will be having someone else upload my files." option. The link beneath this option allows you to send an email to the person with your files, giving them both your order # and a link to the page they will use to upload your files. When you finish placing your order by clicking the "Send Order" button, you will receive a confirmation that includes your order Number. Give your designer your order number and have them upload the files from our File Upload page. Do not have them upload the files without your order number, or we may not be able to match them with your order.

 

23. How long does it take for me to get the proof of my job?
Once you have placed your order, you should get it within 1-2 business days after we receive your electronic files.

 

24. How long will it take to get my order?
Most jobs will be shipped within 4 business days after you approve your proof online.

 

 

 

25. How can I get my order even faster?
Our standard service is quite fast. For most products we ship your order within 4 days after you approve your proof online, via FedEx Ground. In most parts of the country, that means you will have your order in about 6-10 days.

 

26. Shipping Services
Our online shipping prices are valid within the continental United States. For Alaska and Hawaii, please order using 2nd Day Air service. We are also happy to ship to you anywhere around the world. Please provide us the exact shipping address (street address if available), along with the quantity and product type you want to order, and we will let you know the additional shipping costs. Please note that some services are not available to all countries.

 

27. Where can I check shipping transit times?
We primarily use UPS for standard ground shipments. You can view UPS Ground Time-In-Transit in­formation by entering our zipcode, 75243, at this page: https://wwwapps.ups.com/ctc/request?loc=en_US&WT.svl=PNRO_L1

 

28. Will I always receive exactly the quantity I order?
Most of the time, we ship you slightly more than you ordered, free of charge. On occasion, we ship slightly fewer pieces than you ordered. Printing industry trade standards allow for underages of up to 5%. If you plan to send your print order to a mailing list or need a guaranteed quantity, we recommend that you order 5% over the mini­mum quantity you need.

 

29. What if I want to change something on my order after I've placed it or approved the proof?
We require an electronic "paper trail" for all changes made after your initial order is placed.You may make changes to such things as quantity, shipping method, or shipping address by going to the Change Order Request page. Please note that some changes cannot be made after certain stages in the production process -- for in­ stance, the quantity cannot be changed once your job has been printed.

 

 

 

30. Mailing Services:
Can you mail my postcards, brochures, etc. if I send you a mailing list?
Yes! For postcards, brochures and newsletters, We will be glad to mail your material to a list of mailing addresses that you supply.

 

31. Can you use my mailing permit and mail my material from your location?
We are able to mail from our service location using our mail permit only. Mailing permits are tied to local USPS offices and may only be used in the locality where they are issued. If you'd like us to address your material and ship it to you, you could use your own permit and mail it from your location.

 

32. Can I have you mail some of my order and ship the rest?
Simply set the full print quantity in your order and set the Mailing Services quantity to the number of addresses in your mailing list. We'll ship the quantity which is not mailed to the shipping address you provide on the order form.

 

33. How should I lay out a piece to comply with USPS mailing regulations? Do you have postcard and brochure templates?
Please see our "U.S. Mail Layout Guides" for postcard and brochure templates that include both print­ing and mailing layout guidelines. Also, please give us a ring for further information or assistance in preparing your design for mailing. File Preparation

 

34. Can I send you documents created in MS Word or PowerPoint?
Absolutely! If you have created documents in Word or PowerPoint that contain photos, clip-art, or other color images,send them in. Same great service, same great pricing.

 

35. What other file formats can you take?
We can take any Mac or PC version of Quark, Pagemaker, InDesign, CorelDRAW!, Illustrator, Photoshop, Free­hand, Publisher, Word, PowerPoint, any file output as a PDF or listed on our File Formats page. If you have other file formats, we may be able to handle them, too. Just ask!.

 

36. What types of storage media do you accept?
We can take your files on a CD, DVD or flash drive.

 

37. How well will my job match what I see on my monitor?
Most people are surprised at how well their job matches what they see. But because of wide differences in moni­tor calibration and the different technologies used, some printed colors may not exactly match the colors on a your specific monitor. We do our best to make your job look good. See our design hints page for a more technical description.

 

38. What is the difference between the RGB and CMYK color space and why does it matter?
RGB refers to the primary colors of light, Red, Green and Blue, that are used in monitors, television screens, digital cameras and scanners. CMYK refers to the primary colors of pigment: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. These are the inks used on the press in "4-color process printing", commonly referred to as "full color printing". The combination of RGB light creates white, while the combination of CMYK inks creates black. Therefore, it is physically impossible for the printing press to exactly reproduce colors as we see them on our monitors.

 

Many programs have the capability to convert the layout/images from the RGB color space to the CMYK color space. We request that you convert your colors from RGB to CMYK if your tools allow you to. By doing it your­self, you have maximum control over the results.You may notice a shift in color when converting from RGB to CMYK. If you do not like the appearance in CMYK, we recommend that you make adjustments while working in CMYK (usually lightening). Generally, you should specify CMYK color builds that look a little lighter than you want, since the dots of ink "fatten up" on press, giving you more pigment on paper than you see on your moni­tor. Be especially careful to keep backgrounds light if there is black or dark colored text over it, so that the text remains readable. See our RGB and CMYK Information page for more details.

 

39. How can I know what a particular CMYK color combination will look like?
To purchase a color guide with over 3,000 process colors with their CMYK screen percentages, please visit Ama­zon.com.  http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_4_7?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=pantone+color+guide&sprefix=pantone%2Caps%2C225

 

40. Will you match a sample I print out on my own printer, or a previously printed sample?
Part of the way we offer fast turnaround and low pricing is by printing to a "pleasing color" standard, using standard ink densities. Therefore, there is no guarantee that your finished piece will approximate your printed sample. This is due in part to the widely varying results from different output devices including inkjet and laser printers, continuous tone proofing devices, high-resolution film-based proofs, and different than true offset lithography. Even from one commercial printing firm to another, there can be significant differences in results. In particular, inkjet and laser prints are known to look substantially different than true offset lithography. If you require precise color match, please contact us to arrange for a digital color proof. Once you approve the additional fees (starting at $40), we will produce and send you a hard proof via overnight delivery. When you ap­prove and return the proof, we will strive to match the color of the proof when printing your final piece. There are substantial additional charges for precise color match service. Also, if you request color correction or other changes after you see your proof, there will be a minimum of another $40+ charged for color correction time and a new proof. Bottom line: the final product we produce for you is unlikely to match the output from your inkjet -- it will look more professional!

 

41. If I'm sending a Publisher file, should I compress it with "Pack and Go," or should I just send the normal *.pub file?
While we can work with either type, we prefer to get the normal, uncompressed file. Please do not use Publisher's "Pack and Go" feature. If you are sending Publisher files with linked graphics (generally NOT recommended in Publisher), please gather all the associated files into a single Zipped file, and send us that. Compressing files with Winzip or PK Zip (or StuffIt on the Mac) is also the preferred method for Quark, Pagemaker, Illustrator, InDesign or any file with linked graphics. If you are using a font that is not included with Publisher, please send it along with your Publisher file. You can either Zip them together, or upload the font as an additional file upload (or include it on cd or zip-disk if you are sending files via mail.) How do I check for proper imposition or backup? "Imposition" and "backup" refer to how the front of a printed piece is oriented to the back. In the case of a bro­chure, you normally turn it over right-to-left (like you turn the page of a book) in order to have the back side read correctly -- not upside down. Seems simple, until you get to a postcard where one side is layed out in land­scape (horizontal) orientation, and the other side in portrait (vertical) orientation. We use our best judgement when imposing a job, so that it backs up in the most natural or normal manner. Some designs, however, contain both portrait and landscape elements on both sides, making it difficult to make a clear call. When reviewing your proof online, we will always post the front and the back in the orientation that they will print in relation to each other. So, if page 2 appears upside down, that is how it will be printed on the back of page 1. (Some people want it that way, so that the recipient of the piece must turn it over top-to-bottom in order to read it correctly.) Be sure to print out a copy of your online proof, and attach the two sides to each other to create a "mockup" or "dummy." This is especially important when a job will be folded.

 

42. How much bleed should I have for an envelope?
1/16 inch is the correct amount since it will wrap a little to the back of the envelope.

 

43. How should I take pictures with my digital camera?
Digital cameras are wonderful tools that allow us to capture our images in many different ways. The camera is designed to actually take three pictures; one in red, one in green and the other in blue (similar to the way a projection TV works). It then combines the colors together and saves the image onto the picture card. It is very important to make sure that the camera is set to the highest quality setting possible. This means that if you can only save one image on the picture card instead of 12, 64 or 128 images, then this is good! You want to create the best quality picture that the camera can make. This will mean large file sizes and slow downloads from the cam­era itself, but it will get you the best possible results from your camera. Remember, images should be at 300dpi in their final size in the layout! More often than not, we notice that images that come from digital cameras print darker than expected on the printing press. Check to see if you have a brightness option in your image editing program to lighten the entire piece. If you have the opportunity to change the color space from RGB (red, green, blue) to the printing press colors of CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black), then do so! It is always better to have you change the color space if you can, than for us to do it. Remember, not all colors that you can see that are cre­ated by elements of light (RGB) can be created by the elements of ink (CMYK) on press. If you do not have this capability with your software, do not worry about it, we will change it for you for free! Finally, we recommend that you apply a little sharpening to the image. This will make the image a little crisper and will print better on press.

 

44. How can I tell what resolution the image from my digital camera is?
Some digital cameras will let you know what the image resolution is, while others will tell you what the pixel dimensions of your image are. If you know what the pixel dimensions of your images are either from the camera itself or through the image editing software, you can do a little math to determine the resolution, and the size you can print the image at for clear and crisp printing. Simply write down the pixel dimensions of your image and divide those numbers by 300 if the image does not include text and 400 if the image does include text. For example: An image without any text has a pixel dimension of 600 x 900 pixels. Once each dimension is divided by 300 the result is 2 x 3 inches. This means that you can use this image at 2 x 3 inches or smaller in your layout for quality printing results. If your image editing software does not tell you what the pixel dimensions are, but it does tell you what the resolution is, then you know the maximum size you can use that image in your layout. We recommend that images be at 300dpi in their final size in the layout and 400dpi if the images include text. Please keep in mind that resolution and physical dimensions are in direct proportion to each other. If you have an im­age that is 2x2 at 300dpi and increase its size in the layout to 4x4 the new resolution is now 150dpi. So remember, when you bring an image in to your layout you can shrink it down in size (because the resolution will increase) but you will be limited as to how far you can increase it in size. See our Resolution page for more information on image resolution.

 

45. Where can I get more information on file and image resolution?
Our Resolution page has a comprehensive explanation of resolution and tips on how to properly prepare images to achieve the best quality printing.

 

46. Do you have templates to help me correctly design my project?
Templates are available on some of the product ordering pages. Our Design Templates page has a list of currently available templates. Look for more in the near future.

 

47. How should I lay out a piece to comply with USPS mailing regulations? Do you have postcard and brochure templates?
Please see our postcard templates and brochure templates that have mailing requirements on them. Also, please give us a ring for further information.

 

48. Where can I get some more tips on designing a brochure?
Easy: check out "How To Make A Super Brochure Or Mailing Piece", Brochure Printing Design Concepts and Brochure Design Tips for Business.

 

49. Where can I get more information on file preparation?
Our technicians are always available to assist you during business hours. You can reach us by email at help@graphicservicesinc.net and by phone at 214-503-1981.

 

File Transfer

 

50. What types of storage media do you accept?
We can take your files on a CD, DVD or flash drive. Where to send it.

 

51. How long will it take to upload my files?
It will vary depending upon your file size, the speed of your Internet connection and the volume of Internet traf­fic at the time you send it. Check this table for approximate upload times.

 

52. Why can't I see my graphics file in the file upload utility?
You need to change the "Files of Type" dialog box away from the default of "HTML FILES" to "All Files (*.*)". The dialog box will then display all file types. We apologize for this inconvenience. It is an annoying feature of some older browsers.

 

53. How do I place an order and have my graphic designer upload my files separately?
Use the ordering pages and select the " I will be having someone else upload my files. Give your designer your order number and have them upload the files from our File Upload page. Do not have them upload the files without your order number, or we may not be able to match them with your order. Detailed Instructions for you and the person uploading the files.

 

 

 

54. Should I do anything special if I'm on AOL?
If you use America Online (AOL) for your internet connection, you should be aware that AOL can limit your inactivity on the web and disconnect you from the internet if you are not a current, active user. Uploading files appears to be inactivity to AOL. It is recommended that you keep your AOL email account open at the same time you are uploading your files. This can trick AOL programming into thinking you are still active on the internet, thereby preventing the possibility of getting disconnected during your file upload.

 

55. Do I need to impose my business cards 8-up or 10-up if they will be printed more than 1 to a sheet?

 

No, send us a single layout of your job unimposed, we will handle any imposition needed on our end.

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